Qu'est-ce qu'un toxicologue ?

Scouring the internet for information about birth control can leave you feeling confused. Knowing the facts can help you separate myth from fact.

Depending on your health history and goals, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following methods of birth control to help prevent pregnancy or, in some cases, treat certain health conditions:

  • hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, IUDs, or injections)
  • copper IUDs
  • barrier methods (condoms or diaphragms)
  • permanent methods (tubal ligation or vasectomy)

Some people use other methods of birth control, such as the pull-out method or fertility awareness methods.

There are many misconceptions about birth control, which can leave you with a lot of questions. Knowing the facts can help you understand more about birth control and decide which method is best for you.

Read on to get the facts behind common myths about birth control.

Myths about side effects

Like any medication or procedure, birth control methods may cause certain side effects. But there’s some information out there that the risks of certain side effects are greater than they are.

Myth: Birth control will make me gain weight.

Fact: Although some people report weight gain while using hormonal contraceptives, a 2021 review found that there’s not enough evidence to conclude that hormonal contraceptives cause weight gain.

When weight gain does occur after starting hormonal contraceptives, it’s typically less than 5 pounds within the first year.

Myth: Birth control damages fertility.

Fact: Hormonal contraceptives, copper IUDs, and barrier methods of birth control are reversible — which means that your fertility will return after you stop using them.

According to a 2023 review, fertility typically returns within less than 6–12 months of stopping hormonal contraceptives. Some people become pregnant within a month of stopping hormonal contraceptives, while others go for a year or longer without becoming pregnant.

Factors other than birth control may affect your fertility.

Myth: The shot causes hair to fall out.

Fact: Although some people experience chute de cheveux after taking Depo-Provera, the risk is low.

The manufacturer reports that 1.1% of people in clinical trials reported hair loss or no hair growth after taking Depo-Provera. It’s not certain whether the shot or other factors caused these changes.

UN 2020 review reports that other forms of hormonal contraceptives may also worsen or trigger hair loss in some people or, in some cases, reduce hair loss or improve hair growth.

The risk of hair loss may be higher with progestin-only hormonal contraceptives and older forms of combination contraceptives than newer forms of combination contraceptives.

Talk with your doctor to learn how specific forms of birth control may affect your hair.

Myth: Birth control causes depression.

Fact: UN 2021 review found that hormonal contraceptives don’t increase the risk of depression symptoms.

Some people report that their mood or mental health gets worse after they start taking birth control, and others report that their mood or mental health improves.

Let your doctor know if you think you might be experiencing depression or another mental health challenge. They can help determine the cause and prescribe treatment.

Myth: Birth control will imbalance my hormones and make me ‘crazy.’

Fact: Although some people experience worse moods after starting hormonal contraceptives, other people find that their mood improves, stabilizes, or doesn’t change.

More research is needed to understand how birth control-related changes in hormones may affect mood in different people. Some people may have a higher risk of mood side effects than others.

Talk with your doctor if you notice changes in your mood after you start taking birth control. They can help you learn whether your birth control or other factors may be playing a role.

Myths about methods

Some people have beliefs about the benefits or risks of certain birth control methods that aren’t fully accurate.

Myth: Birth control can prevent STIs.

Fact: Using condoms correctly during sex helps to lower your risk of contracting or transmitting sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but other forms of birth control don’t protect against STIs.

Your doctor can help you learn how to prevent STIs. You can also talk with your doctor to learn which STIs you should get tested for and how often.

Talking with your partner about STI testing is also important. Visit the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to find tips for starting this conversation.

Myth: IUDs get lost inside people.

Fact: It’s possible but relatively rare for an intrauterine device (IUD) to fall out or move on its own.

If you have an IUD, you can check whether it’s still in place by inserting a clean finger into your vagina and feeling for the IUD strings or the plastic of the device itself.

Contact your doctor right away if you suspect that your IUD has moved or fallen out. They’ll conduct a physical exam and may order an ultrasound or other imaging tests to check its location.

Myth: The ring will fall out.

Fact: Although it’s possible for the NuvaRing to slip out of your vagina, muscles in your vagina should help keep it in place.

If the ring slips out, Planned Parenthood recommends rinsing it in cool water and putting it back in place.

The ring may be less effective at preventing pregnancy if it’s been out of your vagina for more than 2 days and it’s not your ring-free week. Using condoms as backup birth control during vaginal intercourse can help prevent pregnancy if this is the case.

Myth: The patch will fall off.

Fact: It’s possible but relatively rare for the birth control patch to fall off on its own.

According to Planned Parenthood, you can try to stick a birth control patch back on if it’s been less than 24 hours since it’s loosened or fallen off. Use a new patch if you’ve lost the old patch or it won’t stick fully to your skin.

If it’s been more than 24 hours since a birth control patch has loosened or fallen off, then you can apply a new patch. However, depending on how far into your patch cycle you are, you might need to use backup birth control such as condoms or emergency contraception.

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist to learn whether this is necessary.

Myths about effectiveness

Some birth control methods tend to be more effective than others — and any type of birth control may become less effective if you don’t use it properly every time.

Some people have beliefs about the effectiveness of birth control methods that aren’t fully accurate.

Myth: I don’t have to take birth control if I’m careful during sex.

Fact: You can still get pregnant from vaginal intercourse, even if your partner pulls out during sex or you try to avoid sex during phases of your menstrual cycle when you’re fertile.

The pull-out method of birth control involves removing the penis from the vagina before ejaculation, which is only 78% effective for preventing pregnancy.

Fertility awareness methods involve tracking your menstrual cycle to identify your fertile days and avoiding sex on those days. Depending on the specific fertility awareness method you use, it’s 77–98% effective.

Hormonal contraceptives, copper IUDs, barrier methods, or permanent methods of birth control may be easier or more effective for many people to use. Talk with your doctor to learn about your birth control options.

Myth: If I miss a dose of pills, I can double or triple up, and it still works.

Fact: Birth control pills are less effective at preventing pregnancy if you miss a dose, and it’s possible to overdose on birth control pills by taking too many doses on the same day.

If you miss taking one or more doses of your pill, the next steps you should take will depend on the specific type of pill and when you missed taking it.

Consider taking this quiz from Planned Parenthood to learn about the next steps.

You can also talk with your doctor or pharmacist to learn what to do.

They might advise you to adjust your dose for a day and use backup birth control methods, such as condoms or emergency contraception until your birth control pill reaches its full effectiveness again.

Myth: Antibiotics decrease the effectiveness of birth control.

Fact: UN 2021 review reports that most common antibiotics don’t reduce the effectiveness of birth control — with the exception of rifampin, which lowers the amount of contraceptive hormones in your body.

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist to learn whether an antibiotic will affect your birth control. In some cases, they might advise you to use backup birth control, such as condoms, for some time during and after antibiotic use.

Myth: Taking a break from birth control is good for my body.

Fact: Most people can safely take birth control without any breaks, and your risk of accidental pregnancy may increase if you stop taking birth control while sexually active.

It might be beneficial to stop taking birth control or change your birth control method if you:

  • want to try to get pregnant
  • have reached menopause
  • have gotten a tubal ligation
  • have developed side effects from birth control that are hard to manage
  • have developed a health condition that changes the risks of your birth control
  • are not sexually active and are not taking birth control to manage a health condition

If you stop taking birth control during a time when you’re having vaginal intercourse and you haven’t reached menopause or had a tubal ligation, your chances of getting pregnant will increase.

Your doctor can help you learn about the potential benefits and risks of stopping birth control or changing birth control methods. They can also help you learn how to prevent pregnancy while changing birth control.

Myth: All birth control methods work right away.

Fact: Although barrier methods of birth control work right away, it may take a week or sometimes longer for many other types of birth control to reach their full effectiveness.

It’s also important to know that birth control is not 100% effective. Your chances of getting pregnant while using birth control depend on the specific type of birth control you use, as well as how consistently you use it.

Your doctor or pharmacist can help you learn which methods of birth control are most effective and how long it will take for your birth control to become as effective as possible.

Talking with your doctor

Your doctor or pharmacist can help you learn about different types of birth control, including:

  • how to take them
  • how well they work
  • the potential risks and side effects

Let your doctor know if you have questions or concerns about your current birth control method or if you’re interested in learning about other options.

Also, talk with your doctor if you think you might be experiencing side effects from birth control. They can help you learn what’s causing your symptoms and recommend treatment, which might include a change in birth control.

Your doctor can also help you learn how to manage the risk of STIs.

The takeaway

Getting the facts about birth control may help you make more informed decisions about whether and how to use it, as well as which method might be best for you.

Your doctor can help you learn about the potential benefits and risks of different birth control methods and how to use your chosen birth control in a way that makes it as safe and effective as possible.

They can also help you learn how stopping or changing your birth control may affect your risk of pregnancy or other health changes.

Keep in mind that condoms are the only form of birth control that helps lower your risk of STIs. Other birth control methods don’t prevent STIs. Your doctor might recommend STI testing, as well as condom use or certain medications, to help manage your risk of STIs.


**What ‌is a Toxicologist?**



**Definition:**



A toxicologist is a ​scientist who studies the adverse effects of chemicals and other substances on living organisms. They investigate the properties, mechanisms of action, and health consequences of toxic substances, and develop strategies ⁣to mitigate their harmful effects.



**Key Responsibilities:**



* **Toxinology Research:** Investigate the toxicity,⁤ metabolism, and mode of action of various ⁣substances, including chemicals, drugs, and environmental contaminants.

* **Risk Assessment:** Evaluate the potential risks associated with⁢ exposures to toxic substances and determine safe exposure limits.

* **Toxicology Testing:** Conduct toxicity‌ tests on animals, cells, or tissues to determine the effects of substances on biological systems.

* **Regulatory Compliance:** Advise policymakers and regulatory agencies on safety standards and guidelines for the use and disposal⁤ of toxic⁢ substances.

* **Forensic Toxicology:** Analyze biological samples to detect and‍ quantify toxic substances in cases of poisoning, drug overdose, or environmental⁤ exposure.

* **Education and Training:** Educate and train ​professionals in the field of toxicology and related disciplines.



**Qualifications:**



Toxicologists typically hold advanced degrees in toxicology, pharmacology, chemistry, or related fields. They have specialized knowledge ⁤in:



* **Toxicology Methods:** Techniques and methodologies for toxicity testing and analysis

* **Chemistry and Biochemistry:** Properties and interactions of toxic​ substances

* **Pathophysiology:** Mechanisms⁢ by which toxic substances cause adverse effects

* **Epidemiology and Biostatistics:** Data analysis and interpretation for‌ toxicology studies



**Work Settings:**



Toxicologists may work in various industries and‌ settings, including:



* Academia

* Government agencies

* Pharmaceutical and chemical companies

* Environmental consulting firms

* Forensic laboratories

* Regulatory institutions



**Importance of Toxicologists:**



Toxicologists ​play a crucial role in protecting public health and the environment. Their work:



* Supports​ the development of safe medications and products

* Provides evidence for environmental regulations to minimize chemical exposure

* Assists in ‌investigating and managing poisonings and⁣ environmental disasters

* Contributes to ‌the advancement of scientific knowledge on the toxicity of substances

*‌ Informs policymaking to ensure ‌the⁤ responsible use and disposal of chemicals

2 commentaires

  1. A toxicologist is a scientist who studies the effects of toxic substances on living organisms. They work to understand how toxic substances can cause harm, and to develop ways to prevent or treat the effects of toxic exposure. Toxicologists may also work to develop new drugs or treatments for diseases that are caused by toxic substances.

  2. Toxicologists are scientists who study the effects of toxic substances on living organisms, working to understand how toxic substances can cause harm and developing ways to prevent or treat the effects of toxic exposure.

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